I don’t believe in a personal God. Except Yahweh is real.

“I don’t believe in a personal God. Except Yahweh is real.”

land before time fuck

How do you respond to Catholics who think they’re smarter than other Christians when they say, “I am not a Fundie because I don’t believe in a personal god, or that the bible was written by God. But I believe there were some miracles in the bible, and an advanced entity really appeared to various ancient people in many regions.”

They then invent justifications for the miracles in Egypt, or why the bible matches with real history. They resent being called indoctrinated by religion even when they invent their own reasons to subscribe to metaphysical wankery. How do you reason with people that aren’t even intellectually honest enough to be introspective? They’re like ducks that refuse to be labeled as ducks, or brunettes that take offense at being told they’re brown-haired?

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2 thoughts on “I don’t believe in a personal God. Except Yahweh is real.

  1. “How do you reason with people that aren’t even intellectually honest enough to be introspective?”

    My position is that Christianity and other traditional religions function as full-blown training grounds in deception and self-deception for people. At one point I thought that maybe Christians just weren’t all that bright. But I had to take into account the fact that I knew some Christians who were quite smart. So I then came to the view that the real problem was that they just weren’t all that *honest*–at least, not all the time and about all matters. What the professional apologists actually do is provide ordinary Christians with the “cover” they need so that they can go on being dishonest with themselves while making the whole thing look minimally plausible and seemly, both to themselves and others.

    The simple fact is, traditional religions are not the morally edifying force in the world that they would have everyone believe they are.

    If you check out my site and the essay I wrote, I talk more about this sad state of affairs, and also about how we might conceivably go about changing it.

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