Should one pretend to be a christian for your kids? – Thread

If I have kids I want them to be able to fit into society and yet not be easily brainwashed. I am thinking of sending them to sunday school and pretending to be a fundamentalist Christian while otherwise being completely honest and encouraging them to think critically. Aside from Christianity I would provide them with a secular educational materials. When they hit 12 if they still believe I’d tell them I’ve been an Atheist for a long time. It’d be similiar to letting kids have fun and then when they get older saying there is no santa clause.

My goal is to make sure they question everything for themselves, even what their parents say. I am worried they’d feel betrayed so I’d tell them there is a white lie I’ve told you which I’ll tell you when you’re twelve. It would be the same white lie I would tell to a child if I ever adopted one, so they would feel a sense of belonging until they were mature enough to handle the truth.

>Pretend to be a Christian.
>Be rational.

Pick one.

>Wanting your kids to fit into a brain dead society.


>Not wanting them to aspire to rise above the masses and become revered and held in high regards.

You are what’s wrong with society. Always wanting to fit in and please every pleb you meet.

I don’t want them to be vulnerable to Christian propaganda in their later years such as “What do you know about Christianity. You never even were one.” Or, “Being a Christian gives a feeling nothing else can.” I think it helps to experience the lifestyle and hypocritisy of a cult when younger, but the important thing is not to stay part of the cult long enough for it to significantly deaden your mind.

This raises a fun question. Would you rather be born a smart and educated man who was raised to believe in in many lies, or a dumb man who was less educated but who had the power to see through the bullshit?

Your baby is not a toy
What the fuck is wrong with you?

Are you aware that sunday school is not an enviroment open to discourse and critical interpretations? It’s indoctrination. Plain and simple. You want to force your children through this crap instead of teaching them _about_ religions and critical thinking skills and letting them figure out their faith for themselves.

>It’d be similiar to letting kids have fun and then when they get older saying there is no santa clause.

There is a difference between telling children that Santa Clause doesn’t bring presents and keeping your children awake at night for fear that their non-fundamentalist schoolmates and friends will experience agony for all eternity in hell.

>My goal is to make sure they question everything for themselves, even what their parents say.

Children stop believing everything their parents say at a certain age automatically.

> You want to force your children through this crap instead of teaching them _about_ religions and critical thinking skills and letting them figure out their faith for themselves.

I still want to teach them those things, but why stop at knowledge? If you teach someone a lie when they grow up, and then pull back the curtain on that lie, I think they’d be stronger when faced with liars in the future.

Christians and Atheists like to teach their kid what they see is the right path from the start. But what if you teach them a lie, prod them to cognitive dissonance, and then pull back the curtain on the lie early on? Presto! A lifetime of healthy skepticism.

Then your children will not see you as someone that you can trust, but they will see you as a liar.

Kids don’t think about religion.

Just do the fun stuff from holidays…

Santa Claus,, chocolate bunnies, and ghosts for Halloween.

Normal children don’t talk about Jesus to each other.

Hell! normal adults don’t talk about Jesus all that much.

Just the usual platitudes about “thank god” on special occasions.

And we can fake that to be polite, like saying a “have a nice day” when you don’t care.

What the fuck? Just teach them what is reasonably true and not to be shitty about their beliefs. It’s rarely relevant to even bring up being an atheist. You also shouldn’t raise them to be atheist. Raise them to think critically and let them come to their own conclusions. If you do your job right, they’ll naturally be atheist or agnostic. Don’t make a point about being atheist unless someone brings up religion as a topic for discussion (unlikely except for door knockers or what have you).

Holy shit OP, I just can’t be bothered to reply seriously to you. Just how in the hell can you claim to support critical thinking and lie to little people who are growing and learning from you so hard?

Just read this really clearly:
> I am thinking of sending them to sunday school and pretending to be a fundamentalist Christian
> and encouraging them to think critically

You can’t think critically by yourself, let alone your kids. And if you do indeed have children I feel sorry for them because their father can’t teach them some basic logic. Pretending to be a fundamentalist christian with your kids will not make them smarter or more open to ideas.


After they come back from Sunday School you can ask what they learned. When they talk about Noah’s ark question if they believe it is possible and question them hard on how Noah’s family could build such a big boat or how so many animals could fit into such a large boat. Try to make sure your kids know how difficult it is to build a boat and how many animals there are before they get to that story. Do the same with the rest of Genesis and Exodus. It could be a useful method to teach skepticism.

> It’d be similiar to letting kids have fun and then when they get older saying there is no santa clause.
If you want kids to have fun then why send them to Sunday School? That shit’s boring, yo.

I’d say just let them come to their own conclusions. If they ask about God or Christianity then be honest about what that’s all about.If they ask why you personally don’t believe in a God then explain your reasons.

As others have said, religions doesn’t really cross children’s minds to begin with. Even when I was younger I didn’t have all that much of an opinion on religion despite half my family being pretty religious.

chances are you kid will just want to play video games or hang out with friends.

 If you do your job right, they’ll naturally be atheist or agnostic

I strongly suggest you don’t have kids until you sort this out. You will only confuse them further.

Children, regardless of what some may tell you, aren’t capable of grasping complex social dynamics.

Their first and most obvious question will be: “If there’s no God, why are we in church?”

Their second question will be: “Why aren’t we proud of who we are?”

You better have a damn good answer. Until you do, I suggest double layer condoms.

Kids are terrible at keeping secrets unless you give them an unhealthy persecution complex: thou must not reveal you are an Atheist to Christians. That’s why it’d be easier for them to live believing they are Christians. They can mingle without ostrachization or extra discrimination from parents, until you reveal there is no Santa Clause or God.

The first question has reasonable. You’re here to learn what most people believe so you can better deal with people when you grow up. In fact, I think it might be a good idea to teach them mythology and folklore from several countries, since Greek mythology widened my own perspective.

The second question can be answered with, “You can tell people what you want now that you’re old enough. And Atheist or not, religion or lack thereof should never be the primary source of your self-worth. But if you do want to feel special, let me tell you secrets from academia about how the bible was written and what it has made people do.”

As I drove home today I saw two kids holding a sign by the road, “The punishment for sin is an eternity in hell.” They must have been about 10 years old. On the other side of the road a man was holding a sign…something about Jesus rising from the dead. Neither was particularly loving message. At least I could get a few chuckles if the sign said “God loves you” but making kids carry such an angry message is bad parenting.

Christians look at this and probally feel good. They think, it’s nice to see Christian kids being raised to love God, and it’s nice someone is willing to take the time to spread the gospel. But going to this extreme, and forcing your kids into indoctrination and carrying signs this early is imo child abuse.

This is what I wish my parents had taught me about god.
(Mis-attributed Marcus Aurelius quote)
marcus aurelius pic

Op here, I now think it’d be better to teach kids them the myths and philosophy of the bible, and take them to church a handful of times so they know what it’s like. But I’ve decided I wouldn’t want my parents to lie to me so I wouldn’t do that. I won’t brainwash them either.

I would also teach them some counter arguments and non-Christian myths, but I wouldn’t present anything as pure truth, and would encourage them not to believe in absolute truths.

This Atheist author sent his daughter to a Christian preschool, and then taught his kids about other myths at home. He decided not to tell them anything was wrong, but to encourage them to analyze ideas. Isn’t there a danger that not telling them anything will leave them susceptible to indoctrination from their peers?

http://infidels.org/kiosk/article/parenting-beyond-belief-on-raising-ethical-caring-kids-without-religion-758.html

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